Brother Deric Addresses the “Knockout Game”


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Brother Deric addresses the media regarding the so-called “Knockout Game.”

Religious and community leaders outraged by last week’s so-called knockout game incident gathered Sunday to call for an end to racially motivated violence.

“It’s an assault,” activist Deric Muhammad said Sunday. “It’s a crime against an innocent person.”

Religious and community leaders, primarily from the black community, crowded around Muhammad in the Houston office of the Council on American-Islamic Relations to call for an end to random violence, particularly when motivated by racism or religious hatred, and to stop referring to the attacks as a game.

Last week, Conrad Barrett, 27, of Katy was charged with a hate crime punishable by 10 years in federal prison and sparked a discussion among area leaders already concerned about community violence. Barrett allegedly spent a week “hunting for African-Americans to prey on” and videotaped himself punching a 79-year-old black man four days before Thanksgiving, prosecutors said in court Friday when a federal judge denied Barrett bail.

“We have to be aware there are people with hatred toward specific minorities who will use ‘knockout’ as thei622x350 (1)r means to express t
heir ill feelings,” said Mustafaa Carroll, executive director of CAIR, pointing to a similar attack on a Muslim woman in London.

E.A. Deckard, pastor of Greenhouse International Church, said Houston must “knockout the knockout game.”

Along with others, Deckard called for expanded educational and recreational activities for youth to make such bad choices seem less appealing and for parents to do more to outline right from wrong, good from evil.

Robert Muhammad, student minister with the Nation of Islam, tied the random attack and other violence nationwide to “disruptive young men.” He condemned a culture that, for instance, celebrates video games where players garner points for committing crimes and gives young men not enough positive alternatives for their free time.

“I am on the tail end of the Baby Boomer generation,” Robert Muhammad said. “We are afraid of Generation X and Generation Y. We are afraid of children and our grandchildren.”


About Deric Muhammad

Deric Muhammad believes that man is given power for one reason; and that is to serve others. Muhammad is an accomplished Houston-based Activist/Organizer who addresses issues on Social Justice, Black Male Development, Police Brutality, Racial Inequality and other critical topics. Muhammad prides himself in being an “on the ground watchman” of Freedom, Justice and Equality for the Black community and other poor, underserved, disenfranchised communities, as well. A native Houstonian, Deric grew up on the rough and tumble streets of Northeast Houston. At the age of 11 his father died and his mother struggled with an addiction to drugs that she, later in life, overcame. Deric was raised in an environment where drugs, gang violence, prostitution, police brutality and other “social cancers” were prominent. This is important to know, because it verifies that Muhammad addresses these issues based on vast knowledge and personal experience. Like countless Black men who came before him, he changed his life around through his studies as a member of the Nation of Islam. Muhammad hosts an annual “Smart’n Up” Black Male Summit that deals with the unique issues that Black men and boys face in society. In 2009 he independently produced and starred in a critically acclaimed documentary called “Raising Boys: Tips for Single Moms” that addressed the plight of Black women raising sons in the absence of a father. He recently launched a Houston-based Black Male Initiative called Project FORWARD that focuses on Stopping Inner-City Violence and creating Economic Development. His writings have been published in many newspapers and he is currently working on his first self-published book. Muhammad has been, for years, seen on local and national television stations addressing the tough issues faced by Black people in America. He says that he is unashamed of his love for Black people and thanks God every day for giving him the honor of serving his community.

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